Guide to dating curt teich postcards

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The government postal cards included a printed 1-cent stamp; the privately printed souvenir cards required a 2-cent adhesive postage stamp to be attached. The term Post Card was not widely used until the early 1900s (it was later contracted to "postcard" as a word-counting cost-saving measure). Government-issued cards were to be designated as Postal Cards (Staff, p. Writing was still not permitted on the address side.Messages were not permitted on the address side of the cards; after attempting various forms of explaining that regulation, the U. Post Office adopted the printed message that This side is for the address only (Staff, p. Other backs from this pioneer era of the American post card are known today as Souvenir Card and Mail Card. In this era, private citizens began to take black and white photographs and have them printed on paper with post card backs.Year Production Numbers: 1908-10 A1 1910 A19922 1911 A22998 1912 A32000 1913 A32236 —A45599 1914 A45600 —A53999 1915 A54000 —A61999 1916 A62000 —A71999 1917 A72000 —A77320 1918 A77321 —A77481 1919 A77482 —A81999 1920 A82000 —A83599 1921 A83600 —A87975 1922 A87976 —A92873 1923 A92874 —A96826 1924 A96827 —A102410 1925 A102411 —A107826 1924 A107827 —A112867 1927 A112868 —A118311 1928 A118312 —A124180 An "-N" after a number indicates it was a reprinted card.Any other alpha character after the number indicates it has more than one subject listing or the same number was used on two different views.

The code reads 2C-H3, the most important part of the code being the 2C.

Compiled by Todd Ellison, Certified Archivist (last revised 8/7/2006)Although the world's first picture postcards date from the 1860s to the mid-1870s, most of the earliest American picture postcards extant today are those that were sold at the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, starting on May 1, 1893. At this time, a dozen or more American printers began to take postcards seriously.

These were illustrations on government-printed postal cards and on privately printed souvenir cards. Congress on May 19, 1898 granted private printers permission to print and sell cards that bore the inscription Private Mailing Card. Still, no message was permitted on the address side. postal regulations on December 24, 1901 stipulated that the words Post Card should be printed at the top of the address side of privately printed cards.

It is believed that in some cases the same view was ordered by another company and the card was printed with "A" or "R" preceding the number.

A small number of cards also filed with this series begin with "BS," "DT," "RG," and "RT." After approximately 1924, the "A" or "R" may not appear on the card at all.

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